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20121202
20121210
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the election. issues like entitlement reform and new revenue, but he's going to have to do something big. there's been a four-year course of he doesn't get along with either party, doesn't make the kind of effort you're talking about. i don't think there's any doubt he's going to, particularly john boehner, find some human interconnection moment that says we're doing this. and that's when the tough part starts. because once there's a leader deal, getting it through the house, whatever the terms of it is going to be super hard. >> i was with a group of businessmen last night, and their question was, why don't the people in washington do what we do when there's an important decision that comes up? why don't they get into a room and hammer it out, get some food, drinks, whether it's a couple days, get them helicopters, and go to camp david. you get in a room together -- >> the president -- the president doesn't like doing that. he's not comfortable doing that. and jon meacham, that is not the opinion of a pundit, that is a matter of historical record for his first four years. is it not? >> that's
talking about every morning here since the election. fiscal cliff, big, big issue. there are now, it seems, growing numbers of people on both the right and the left who would like to see us just go over that fiscal cliff. how big of a problem would that be? >> that would be a big problem. i actually still believe that those -- the democrats, the administration, republicans in the final analysis don't want to see that happen. they do understand that not only would that present a problem in the near term as we went over the cliff at the end of the year, but we still then have the whole debt ceiling fight that would transpire shortly into the new year. the issue isn't simply the negative result of going over the cliff, but it's also that business, consumers, everybody continues to hold back on the uncertainty. and we believe the economy is pretty well positioned potentially in 2013 if we can put this behind us. so i think a lot of what's going on is what you would expect to see in this negotiation, very public negotiation, which is not the best way to do it. i think at some point, the preside
a pretty dramatic shift since the election, and certainly i salute him for doing this, he actually is very engaged with the business community. and i'm not hearing the sort of things from top ceos and business leaders today that i heard the first four years. maybe -- maybe he's leaning in here and trying to rebuild a relationship with some of these people who supported him in '08. >> and i think it goes both ways. i think the business community views this deficit thing as the biggest problem that we can solve that we need to solve. there's something called a campaign to fix the debt, which i'm on the steering committee, 120 leading ceos from everything from general electric to jpmorgan on down. really committed to doing something and accepting the idea that revenues have to go up, not ideological about how, but most of all, wanting a big $4 trillion package. and so they have become, in effect, allies of the president. they're really trying to get to the same place. at some point there may be differences over how much entitlements, how much this or that, but right now their interests are al
the cliff. that's why the day after the election i tried to speed this process up by making the concession to put revenues on the table. it's unfortunate that the white house has spent three weeks doing basically nothing. >> the administration has presented a plan that calls for $1.6 trillion in new tax revenues. $400 billion in cuts to medicare and other entitlements. $50 billion for a new stimulus and congress would have to give up control over raising the debt limit. republicans have indicated that they want to raise revenue by lowering tax deductions, haven't given any specifics yet. brings us right to white house correspondent brianna keilar. good morning, brianna. >> good morning to you, soledad. yes, things are at an impasse here. i will tell you the white house after not being very happy with the pace of negotiations the week before last sent treasury secretary tim geithner up to the hill to outline this proposal. there's a lot we already knew about that president obama had already taken a public position on. the white house is now saying to republicans as well, we want you to put
? there was an election. >> that was not a serious offer that was made. >> well, it was an offer and the republicans haven't made a serious or nonserious offer, joe. >> you've got to go through the house. where is the house plan? >> well, i don't know. but that's -- >> stay tuned. >> our guest hosts will be with us for the rest of the program. up next, we'll talk about monday morning markets. goldman sachs jim o'neill is our special guest. find out if europe or the fiscal cliff is keeping him up at night. >>> later, food for thought. our how dominos is handling economic conditions and their plans to hire for the holiday season. >>> do you think this group of people will find some common sense solution? >> yeah, i think they will. i'm not sure thooes they'll do it by december 1st. >> we know a lot about the opportunities are if they don't. >> in private, in my view, he'll get to something. >> we encourage congress to put aside the political rhetoric and rise above it to make sure we have revenue >>> welcome back, everybody. let's get a sense of where the market is heading in 2013. joining us right now is j
. they can't govern either. >> i was so hopeful, i wasn't obviously thrilled with the election results, but i actually thought that result might be the result we needed to get thefshs done. >> in a way you you have the situation where -- >> you extend 98 but not the 2? believing that story is so -- >> either raise them on everyone or raise them on -- either it will hurt the economy if you raise taxes or it's not. on 98 it won't hurt, on 2 it will -- >> we'll have more on this argument. in the meantime, let's talk about some of the other headlines. financial firms are gathering for the goldman sachs financial services contractors. a key presenter is brian money tha moynihan. we talked about his reports of planned fee increases. plus there was the issue of president obama's likely pick to follow tim geithner at treasury. we talked about how buffett threw out jamie dimon's name. here is what moynihan thinks about that idea. >> i won't give individual names, but i think what warren is expressing a view which i agree with is that we need to have very bright, very talented and very broad experience
answer, but in a minute. let me get to the big concern. the entire conversation since the election has been litigating gone squaquarter of the preside own architecture. all we're talking about is revenue, revenues, revenues. the white house has been absolutely silent on 75% of their own described remedy and that is where are the cuts. now, secretary geithner comes to capitol hill and with a straight face says we need to spend more money. we need more stimulus spending. look, i come from the state of illinois which is an example of what not to do. the state had the same underlying problems, that is runaway spending problems, and they came up with the wrong solution. raise taxes, don't deal with the underlying problem, chase an entrepreneurial class out. $7 billion in unpaid bills and higher average unemployment rate. it is a system for failure. so what's happening with my neighbors in illinois, and these are the people that are minkd their own business, not paying attention to all this stuff, all of a sudden they're looking up and saying why is it more expensive for my child to go to th
on the ballot, proposition 8, california voted in a close election to overturn same sex marriage. same sex marriage was banned after it was briefly legal. the federal district court had a trial there, and said that law, proposition 8, banning same sex marriage, is unconstitutional. that was affirmed on appeal, that is now appealed to the supreme court and they will now decide whether proposition 8 is constitutional or not. >> when we talk about this as being a historical sort of review, clearly there were different laws passed at the state level. so now it is really up to the federal government to kind of step in and say, okay, this is where we have to come together on our thinking. >> it is up to the united states supreme court. not the federal government. the federal government, the last word they have is the defense of marriage act. and what makes this so significant is that the supreme court has not really engaged with the issue of -- of gay rights since 2003. nine years. that's a long time. the country has changed dramatically in those nine years. there is a new gallup poll out that s
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)